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Vernacular Sky-Terrace

By:  | March - 26 - 2015

Honorable Mention
2015 Skyscraper Competition

KHZNH Studio: Amir Izzat Adnan, Nur Farhanah Saffie
Malaysia

City populations are growing faster than the city infrastructure can adapt. The world’s cities are growing because of population shift especially concerning rural to city areas in search of jobs and other opportunities in hopes for improvement of lives and creating better future for the younger generations. Along with the growth and expansion of cities, comes the rise in environmental issues and problems. It comes to the role of future architects, planners and developers to achieve green and sustainable strategies where modern buildings can rely on new forms of energy.

Although most skyscrapers provide solutions of catering the density of population with the spaces they provided as compared to the available space on land, it is highly argued that they do not provide good street-level experience that hence, totally disconnect the street cultures from vertical structures. This disconnection has led to the difficulties, in a case of high-rise apartment living, for families to experience the community living where the proximity to other facilities available in street culture is higher instead of being constrained in the walls and perimeter of the vertical structures they live in.

The exploration of horizontal skyscraper aims to offer dwellers a maximum recreational experience almost as much as living on the ground or surface of the streets. This horizontal skyscraper is building a community where neighborhood qualities and everyday life practices are carried through. People relate to these living environments as part of their identity and, thus, neighborhood community living becomes personally meaningful and relevant. In fact, studies have shown that people who live in close-knit communities are statistically safer and less likely to be burglarized.

By honoring the culture of the nature setting, the Vernacular Sky-Terrace invites visionary ideas for Kampung Baru to become a better city without ‘touching’ the existing fabric. The basic idea for this project is to elevate the existing site and improvise! The decision of hovering over the existing site is inspired by the aims to create one community consisting of office spaces, apartments, commercial area and public landscape also to generate the largest possible green space open to the public, right in the heart of Kuala Lumpur city. Read the rest of this entry »

Cloud Capture

By:  | March - 26 - 2015

Honorable Mention
2015 Skyscraper Competition

Taehan Kim, Seoung Ji Lee, Yujin Ha
Republic of Korea

Neither did we know at first that the juvenile yet ingenious imagination of touching and catching the cloud would bring balance to the Earth…

The mankind, despite their remarkable advancements, could not for once surpass the greatness of nature. In the face of devastating floods and droughts, our bests were mere building of dams and planting of trees. But one day, the abnormalities of climate started to exhibit signs of balance.

The balance comes from redistribution of cloud. Capturing then releasing the clouds from where they are affluent to scarce started to change the color of the planet Earth. The arid-yellow deserts transformed themselves as fresh green. Changes in the nature were only the start of all the other transformations to follow. Read the rest of this entry »

Honorable Mention
2015 Skyscraper Competition

Zhang Zehua, Song Qiang, Liu Yameng
China

So forgettable, so engraved. Time dating back to April 26, 1986 ,a quiet night. With a big bang , the fourth reactor which is located in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded, the amount of radiation is about 400 times of the atomic bomb which is dropped on the Hiroshima. There are about seven million people were forced to leave their homeland in two days, they even had on time to say goodbye to their present life.

But not everyone accepts the arrangement of fate. The negative effects of radiation have been dafeated by a large group of settlers, more and more people are returning to their homeland which located in the restricted area, what can be sure is that they use a different way to look at the risk which they bear . They survived from the harshest environments in the 20th century, Stalin caused the Great Famine in Ukraine in 1930s,which caused millions of people to death, they also experienced the atrocities of the Nazis in 1940s. Therefore, after the Soviet government is stable for years, the Chernobyl incident happen, they do not want to leave because of the enemy which is invisible . There is a kind of heroic toughness and frank reality in their character.

For the people who return , home is no longer a transitory concept , it is a force even to resist the radiation. Their spirit will let us review the meaning of the relative risk and grab a kind of internal emotional contact of motherland— Fallen leaves return to the roots.

Purpose: This project aims to build a skyscraper for them, the air purification equipment and water purification equipment are contained in the skyscraper, the solar power is used to provide energy for internal devices. the skyscraper is just like a Garden of Eden, a new and safe life will start from here.

Principle: Nuclear radiation is consisted of three particles, α,βandγ.In the atomic nucleus, electron will absorb the radiation and give out light when it promoted from lower energy level to higher energy level.Fluorescent plates are used to construct the facade of the skyscraper to shield and use the radiation ,which create a safe and stable living environment for people inside. Read the rest of this entry »

 

eVolo Magazine is pleased to announce the winners of the 2014 Skyscraper Competition. The 2014 edition marks the ninth anniversary of the competition established in 2006 to recognize outstanding ideas for vertical living through the novel use of technology, materials, programs, aesthetics, and spatial organizations.

eVolo Magazine received 525 projects from 43 countries in all continents. The Jury, formed by leaders of the architecture and design fields selected 3 winners and 20 honorable mentions.

The first place was awarded to Yong Ju Lee from the United States for his project “Vernacular Versatility”. The proposal reinterprets traditional Korean architecture in a contemporary mixed-use high-rise.

The second place was awarded to Mark Talbot and Daniel Markiewicz from the United States for his project “Car and Shell: or Marinetti’s Monster” which proposes a city in the sky for Detroit, MI.

The recipients of the third place are YuHao Liu and Rui Wu from Canada for their project “Propagate Skyscraper” that investigates the structural use of carbon dioxide in skyscrapers.

Some of the honorable mentions include a skyscraper that filters the air of polluted cities, a sky village for Los Angeles, a 3D printed tower in the desert, and a vertical transportation hub among other innovative projects.

Awards
First place – US $5000 + press kit distribution by sponsor v2com
Second place – US $2000
Third place – US $1000

The Jury was formed by: Wiel Arets [principal Wiel Arets Architects, dean of the Illinois Institute of Technology’s College of Architecture], John Beckmann [principal Axis Mundi], Michael Hensel [principal AKNW + NAL, professor at Oslo School of Architecture], Lisa Iwamoto [principal IwamotoScott Architecture, professor at University of California Berkeley], Kas Oosterhuis [principal Oosterhuis-Lénárd, professor at Delft University of Technology], Derek Pirozzi [architectural designer Oppenheim Architecture + Design, first place 2013 eVolo Skyscraper Competition], Tom Price [principal Tom Price], Fernando Romero [principal FR-EE], Craig Scott [principal IwamotoScott Architecture, professor at California College of the Arts], Carol Willis [director Skyscraper Museum, professor at Columbia University], and Dan Wood [principal WORK Architecture Company, professor at Yale University]

Vernacular Versatility

By:  | March - 20 - 2014

First Place
2014 Skyscraper Competition

Yong Ju Lee
United States

Hanok is the named used to describe a traditional Korean house. A Hanok is defined by its exposed wooden structural system and tiled roof. The curved edge of the roof can be adjusted to control the amount of sunlight entering the house while the core structural element is a wooden connection named Gagu. The Gagu is located below the main roof system where the column meets the beam and girder and it is fastened without the need of any additional parts such as nails – this connection is one of the main aesthetic characteristics of traditional Korean architecture.

Historically this structural system has been developed exclusively in plan, applied only to one-story residences. However, as various modeling software have been recently developed, there are more opportunities to apply this traditional system into complex high-rise structures that meet contemporary purposes and programs. Vernacular Versatility can open a new chapter of possibilities to bring this old construction and design tradition to the present day with efficiency and beauty. Read the rest of this entry »

Second Place
2014 Skyscraper Competition

Mark Talbot, Daniel Markiewicz
United States

This project proposes a city in the sky for Detroit, MI. The new city is conceived as a vertical suburban neighborhood equipped with recreational and commercial areas where three main grids (streets, pedestrian pathways, and structure) are intertwined to create a box-shaped wireframe. Traditional and contemporary houses and other diverse programs plug in the structure to create a rich vertical urban fabric.

My partner and I have been awake all morning, our faces aglow in front of brightly burning screens, our fingers feverishly clicking to keep pace with our racing thoughts. Franticly driven by decades of fear, themselves perpetuated by an avalanche of numbers and an onslaught of “better world” fantasies born of an endless stream of technological innovation, our mission is clear: rescue Detroit from being rescued. In a world whose only acceptable path is the immediate betterment of our own existence, my partner and I demand the discipline to let it die and live another day. Sweating and panting with the knowledge that our current society’s insatiable and nearsighted appetite for growth, innovation and development is strangling the whispers of life out of the very future it hopes to serve, my partner and I can no longer stand idly by and watch our cities consume themselves with an anxious need for expansion. Our society has been poisoned by the belief that a city in decline is a city in need of resurrection.

MANIFESTO:

1. Revolt! Let us use the efficient machines inefficiently, for pleasure and not production. Loops where once there were straight lines. Dead-ends where before there were connections.

2. Why not rebel in the punishment of a relentless technology? Like a fighter leaning into an opponent’s blow, let us incite, provoke, and encourage our own urban desertion. From rust to silicon, from silicon to…

3. We shall weep for the dark ages, in the presence of the gleaming Renaissance Tower before us. Our royal Detroit we shall serve the rightful king. Long live the king. The king is dead. Long live the king.

4. Throw off the shackles of the endless sprawl ever encroaching on the lakes, streams and fields of this country! Revive the American landscape of boundless freedom and the pleasures of the open road!

5. Commute has become a dirty word. Why? I say commute your decaying suburb for a city in the sky! Read the rest of this entry »

Third Place
2014 Skyscraper Competition

YuHao Liu, Rui Wu
Canada

Carbon capture is an emerging practice aimed at obtaining and containing greenhouse gases to mitigate their net availability in the atmosphere. However, existing carbon capture practices use the method of point capture, catching carbon gases at the source, requiring a significant initial investment in additional facilities, infrastructure, and maintenance of underground storage. Hence, the implementation of point capture method may directly and indirectly contribute to a significant sum of greenhouse gases through construction, material production and processing, in addition to the contingencies associated with underground storage.

Current research on carbon gases suggests alternative method of capture, such as air capture through carbon-philic resins and material processes that transform carbon dioxide into solid construction material.

Taking this one step further, we hypothesized a material capable of assimilating carbon dioxide as a means to self-propagate. Employing such a material allows air capture of carbon dioxide and the resultant production of a solid construction material capable of supporting load. Channeling its properties, we propose a skyscraper that grows. By constructing a simple vertical grid scaffold as a framework, we are given control to the extent and underlying structure of the skyscraper. Required ingredients for material propagation are supplied through the scaffold, while its actual pattern of growth is defined by environmental factors such as wind, weather, and the saturation of carbon dioxide within the immediate atmosphere. Thus each resulting structure is sui generis in its formal expression, while maintaining a regular spatial organization for ease of occupation and adaptation.

Various circulation methods can be employed depending on the need; this and the retrofitting of circulation enable the occupation of individuals in different ways. Naturally, clusters of habitation will emerge with the circulation access at its center, with each structure able to accommodate multiple circulation access ways and clusters. As occupied spaces increase, varying points of access can be linked to form lifted streetscapes between a multiplicity of clusters. While programmatic attributions are left undefined and inherently open to occupying individuals, the open structural framework allows tetris-like stacking and up to six directions to extend existing space. The regularity of its physical form guarantees the ease and accessibility of occupation, attracting and inspiring new methods of habiting within the skyscraper. Given the three-dimensional freedom of occupying space, new forms of social interaction may also emerge as a result.

Unlike conventional skyscrapers, which rely on steel frame and concrete casting, the proposed skyscraper suggests a more environmental conscious construction method, an alternative mode of occupation and ownership, and possibly a distinct organization of social relationships. Read the rest of this entry »

Honorable Mention
2014 Skyscraper Competition

Qiu Song, Kang Pengfei, Bai Ying, Ren Nuoya, Guo Shen
China

Sand Babel is a group of ecological structures designed as scientific research facilities and tourist attractions for the desert. The structures are divided into two parts. The first part, above ground, consists of several independent structures for a desert community while the second part is partially underground and partially above ground connecting several buildings and creating a multi-functional tube network system.

The main portion of each building is constructed with sand, sintered through a solar-powered 3D printer. The top structures are based on the natural phenomena called Tornadoes and Mushroom Rocks, which is very common in deserts. It utilizes a spiral skeleton structure, which is tall, straight and with strong tension, to meet the requirements of residential, sightseeing and scientific research facilities. The dual funnel model not only improves cross-ventilation, but also generates water condensation atop the structures based on temperature differences. The net structure for the portion of underground and surface is similar to tree roots. This design not only helps to keep flowing sand dunes in place but also facilitates communication among the buildings. Read the rest of this entry »

Climatology Tower

By:  | March - 20 - 2014

Honorable Mention
2014 Skyscraper Competition

Yuan-Sung Hsiao, Yuko Ochiai, Jia-Wei Liu, Hung-Lin Hsieh
Japan, Taiwan

If you feel ill, you seek medical assistance. If the city is sick, what should we do? The Climatology Tower is a proposed skyscraper designed as a research center that evaluates urban meteorology and corrects the environment through mechanical engineering. The skyscraper analyses microclimates within cities as a result of the use of industrial materials, the accumulation of buildings, and the scarceness of open spaces.

In order to maintain a healthy environment for the city, two main strategies are employed:

Environmental control engineering
The environmental control system consists of evaluation and operational programs. Evaluation programs inspect city climates through a variety of factors such as insolation, radiation, and thermal coverage. Collected data is compared with humidity levels and then mechanical systems respond to reduce or increase the levels to optimal environmental conditions.

Information expression
In addition to automatically adjusting to optimal environmental conditions, data is transferred from a control center to extensive city departments, giving opportunity to ultimately maintain a healthy environment throughout the entire city. This can benefit entire communities, notifying all of present and upcoming environmental hazards and conditions. Climatic information is also displayed publicly, though digital networks, notifying the public on maintaining certain conditions, to preserve both energy and health. Read the rest of this entry »