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The architectural fundamental principle the design attacks is linearity , which describes the dominating directional dynamic . This dynamic can be expressed both by individual and multiple lines of force , this has particular relevance to architecture both in terms of its making and resultant form. Perceiving lines of force originating from elements such as the bridge. As the architecture moves in the linear horizontal fashion it starts to grow and bend in reaction to the geometry from the bridge which has “ segmental ” arches. The curves from the volumes and the strands echo that geometry from the arches and braid themselves in a loose way to create an excessive and exuberant appearance which represent a lively energy and excitement as they reach for the nature which awaits for them in the other side of the bridge.

Symmetry will be kept visible in plan and elevations but the volumes will alternate their positions through out the bridge. Instead of being repelled by the large building set aside the bridge, the new design will embrace the building and provide connection and alternate pathways. A ground condition will become part of the volumes which circulate in a horizontal fashion with arc shaped strands that merge into and out from the bridge. The orthogonal manner of the existing building is to be broken with curvilinear surfaces that will create interior/exterior conditions when the volumes intertwine with each other. Program will be accommodated judging on the noise level of the two major perpendicular crossings which are the street and the canal. One which is close to nature and the other which resembles rush and mobility. The architecture will not only mimic the standards of the architecture of the bridge but will also respond to the conditions imposed by the context and topography.

The space will force itself to the user and pedestrian by becoming part of the pathways and being forced to interact with. The continuous deformations of the topology will acquire a constant logic and rule which will be repeated with the arc-like strands that the surfaces adopt to establish a visual logic of repetition and unity which is pleasing to the eye and brings a functional space to inhabit.

Design: Jean-Pierre Villafañe at the Savannah College of Art and Design

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