Shanghai Market

By:  | December - 7 - 2009

Special Mention
2006 Skyscraper Competition

Loren M. Supp
United States

 

eVolo06-12-1

Special Mention

 

Rather than looking at the city as an extension of architectonic space, the Shanghai market is here reinvented as an internal extension of a fluid landscape. Operating under this axiom, the vertical market changes the previous horizontality of the urban activity by pulling the city fabric upwards, enabling a further densification of the city.

While modeling the existing economic flows of the city there was revealed a potential for a systemic expansion of the streetscape skyward. This move enables an accretion of market functions, pulling the chaotic action to a single site. Formally and theoretically, the degradative nature of fluid market economics define the building architecture, the thickness of circulatory structure responds to the predicted expenditure of capital as one moves through the building, and space is allocated for market activity accordingly. Read the rest of this entry »

Mist in the Shell

By:  | December - 2 - 2009

Special Mention
2008 Skyscraper Competition

Hajung Lee
United States


Speciall Mention

Special Mention


Throughout history, mankind has been competing to build higher towers, not only to meet spacial demands, but also to celebrate and display their technological ability. Perhaps, this kind of proud achievement is interpreted as the origin of our desire towards vertical architecture. In this sense, one can say that every vertical structure has its own monumentality. While a historical monumental tower speaks of certain memory or event, a contemporary skyscraper should celebrate its height, functions and achievement of technology. The depiction for monumentality of a skyscraper should be a different concept from the representation of a historical monument. Contemporary skyscrapers tend to express their grandiosity in a monotonous way, as if to mimic a historical monument. Read the rest of this entry »

Cell System Morphologies

By:  | December - 1 - 2009

Special Mention
2006 Skyscraper Competition

Marco Vanucci
United Kingdom

 

Special Mention

Special Mention

 

In nature, organisms try to respond to the impact of various forces with minimum energy consumption. Similarly, materials are subject to a process of self-organization/adaptation in relation to the action of intrinsic as well as extrinsic forces acting upon it, aiming to fulfill a state of equilibrium. Exploring the inherent properties governing the behavior of a given material and its effects on the surrounding environment, represents the starting point for a broader understanding of material forms as a mutable, multi-performing, and generative design tool. The bottom-up approach towards the research onto a given material system discloses the opportunity to deeply investigate the proprieties of such a material, as well as opening unexpected potentials for inclusive performances and effects. Read the rest of this entry »

Project Rossija: Moscow

By:  | December - 1 - 2009

Special Mention
2006 Skyscraper Competition

Martin Henn, Max Schwitalla
Russia

 

Special Mention

Special Mention

 

Historically loaded and about to be demolished, the centrally located Hotel Rossija constitutes an exemplary terrain for an architectural operation. Starting with Lissitzky’s Wolkenbügeln in the 1920’s, followed by Stalin’s 7 Sisters, and the Palace of the Soviets in the 1940’s, there is a long history of skyscrapers in the city of Moscow. Contrary to planning of the new suburban business district “Moscow City”, we propose our building to be located in the heart of Moscow. Read the rest of this entry »

Skyscraper for the 21st Century

By:  | December - 1 - 2009

Special Mention
2006 Skyscraper Competition

Michael Samula
United States

 

Special Mention

Special Mention

 

Questioning what possibly is or will be the skyscraper for the XXI Century… It must not be singularly definable, but instead, in a multiplicious manner. A skyscraper for the XXI Century should act and react within itself as well as its context: both locally and globally, reconsider program and activity, generate new appetites, question standard fabrication techniques, create abundant spatial possibilities, and most of all, it must aim to redefine social identity and cultural conditions. Read the rest of this entry »

Bioclimatic Sea Garden Skyscraper

By:  | December - 1 - 2009

Special Mention
2006 Skyscraper Competition

Bea Goller
Spain

 

Special Mention

Special Mention

 

The site selected for the skyscraper is located on the Mediterranean Sea, off the Barcelona Waterfront, creating a grand vertical visual icon at the end of the Diagonal Avenue, in Barcelona; an urban axis, cutting the city grid on NE-SW angle, and finishing on the sea shore. It is erected on an artificial man-made peninsula, on which three intertwined towers would be built. They are entering a marine dominion, maybe representing utopia, extending the city, using a vertical element in a metropolis (Barcelona), while simultaneously turning toward the sky. It fulfills an old desired intention in an unconventional manner. Read the rest of this entry »

Skyparker

By:  | December - 1 - 2009

Special Mention
2006 Skyscraper Competition

Marco Vermeulen, Theo Hauben
Netherlands

 

Special Mention

Special Mention

 

Although it is impossible to imagine contemporary life without car-based mobility, the car is frequently barred from the public space. In European inner cities, where pedestrians rule, the car is viewed as a threat to the city. This is rather strange because, in general, we spend a lot of money on cars and many car owners derive their social status from their possession, to a greater or lesser degree. In addition, sooner or later, most pedestrians become car users forced to descend into dark parking basements. Multi-storey parking facilities are an answer to the ever-growing demand for parking space, particularly where the concentration of activities requires the well-conceived use of space available. Read the rest of this entry »

The “A” Composition

By:  | December - 1 - 2009

Special Mention
2006 Skyscraper Competition

Ratsimiebo Noely, Bommier Pacome, Bruter Jonathan
France

 

Concept Diagram

Special Mention

 

Let us think of a city that is constrained by a complex urban structure. An ordered grid, the compulsory maximal height and density of the imposed vellums, as well as the need for balanced perspectives and visual openings. Every new modification of the city must abide by a strict global composition. The city is also centralized, its urban layers are superimposed, add to each other, organize and stabilize disparities and dis-equilibria. The city can be seen as an ecosystem made of built components, equipments, infrastructures, sport fields, empty spaces, squares, parks, and gardens. The site and placement of each of them is conditioned by a global equilibrium which allows every single element to exist on its own, as well as within a global system. It is a balanced composition. Read the rest of this entry »

Architectural Tree

By:  | December - 1 - 2009

Special Mention
2006 Skyscraper Competition

Adelaide Marchi, Nicola Marchi
France

 

Facade

Special Mention

 

In their search for light, space, balance, and keeping up with the environmental forces, trees are their own architects. A tree’s shape is a fascinating question. One part of its development is generated by its genetic code and the other part by its adaptation to the environment. We think these two factors are the key to understanding architectural design. Read the rest of this entry »

The Genotower 05

By:  | December - 1 - 2009

Special Mention
2006 Skyscraper Competition

Nicholas Pisca
United States

 

Perspective

Special Mention

 

The Genotower05 was an investigation of the potential of 7+ dimensional digital space-time, established through an ever-changing search space which uses a stratification of sculpted numeric and geometric randomness in a resonant eugenic single-celled generative automaton. This stem-cell recursively duplicates, splits and mutates under multi-dimensional distortion. While self-mutilating to isolate regional topological growth, it eventually sheds aged generational cells and produces individualized but intelligent organs, situated in an overall organic structure on multiple transgenic levels. In other words, it was to grow intelligent vertically oriented organs in an intelligent transgenic body from identical digital stem cells, without linear array sets or post-processing. Read the rest of this entry »